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Universal Healthcare’s Been Working Great In Germany For A LONG Time

Written by Mark

Jimmy Dore and Malcolm Fleshner discuss the history of universal healthcare plans. Watch the full episode here: <a href="https://tytnetwork.com/2017/07/13/aggressive-progressives-july-13-2017-2-2/" target="_blank" rel=”nofollow”>https://tytnetwork.com/2017/07/13/aggressive-progressives-july-13-2017-2-2/

Follow Jimmy Dore on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jimmy_dore

Follow Malcolm Fleschner on Twitter: http://twitter.com/CultureShlock

Read more here: https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/04/what-american-healthcare-can-learn-from-germany/360133/

“Germany actually pioneered this type of insurance—it all started when Otto von Bismarck signed his Health Insurance Bill of 1883 into law. (It’s still known as the “Bismarck model” because of his legacy, and other parts of Europe and Asia have adopted it over the years.)

All things considered, it’s good to be a sick German. There are no network limitations, so people can see any doctor they want. There are no deductibles, so Germans have no fear of spending hundreds before their insurance ever kicks in.

There’s also no money that changes hands during a medical appointment. Patients show their insurance card at the doctor’s office, and the doctors’ association pays the doctor using money from the sickness funds. “You don’t have to sit at home and sort through invoices or wonder if you overlooked fine print,” Sophia Schlette, a public health expert and a former senior advisor at Berlin’s National Statutory Health Insurance Physicians Association, told me. That insurance card, by the way, is good for hospital visits anywhere in Europe.”*

Jimmy Dore, Stef Zamorano, & Malcom Fleschner on this week’s Aggressive Progressives. The trio talk about the history of healthcare and Donald Trump Jr’s meeting with a Russian lawyer. A protestor associated with refusefacism.org Skypes in from NYC.

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