March 15, 2011

Redbirds Rule Amid Speaker Team Power Surge
while Budget Players Flex Most Muscle at Capitol

Money is Root of Most Clout as Straus Charter Boosters Wield More Sway
while Same Senators More Powerful than Ever at Top of East Wing Chart

Texas Senate Power Rankings

Fast Track to Power Exemplified

By Mike Hailey
Capitol Inside Editor

There was no flattery intended when conservatives who were attempting to overthrow Texas House Speaker Joe Straus likened some of his top lieutenants to the ecclesiastical pooh-bahs who pick the pope.

In the opposition vernacular, the "cardinals" were 11 House Republicans who huddled privately in Austin one night in early 2009 and anointed Straus as the consensus challenger in a speaker's race that he won in less than 48 hours. The group shrunk considerably when two lost to Tea Party primary foes last year while another left the House for a job as a college chancellor and a fourth died suddenly two days after the November election.

But birds of a feather flock together - and like another famous European quotesmith suggested - what doesn't kill them often makes them stronger especially when they've survived an attempted palace coup without as many of them around to defend it. So it should come as no surprise that the remaining members of Straus' original inner-circle wield more clout now than they did two years ago in a House where the speaker himself is far more powerful than he was in his leadership debut two years ago.

Six of the top 10 House slots on Capitol Inside's Texas Legislature Power Rankings for 2011 are occupied by Republicans who were members of the cabal of insurgents who chose Straus to represent them in a secret ballot vote in his first leadership race. Two of the four-highest ranked representatives on the House power chart are good friends who pledged to Straus in his first race when the outcome was still in question even though they weren't charter supporters on the nominating board.

The San Antonio Republican who leads the lower chamber puts a major premium on loyalty like most smart leaders - and that's evident as the eyes scroll down the hierarchy of power west of the rotunda as the regular session barrels toward the halfway point next week. There are several levels of power among House members who aren't speaker. Immediately below the so-called Straus cardinals the power list contains the names of some other relatively moderate Republicans who'd become key members of the leadership team long before the last session ended. Next you'll find some of the conservative Republicans who backed Straus in his second campaign for speaker after opposing him the first time around. Then come some Democrats who've been in Straus' corner in both races and chair mid-level committees in a chamber where they're outnumbered 101-49 by the first GOP supermajority in history.

While the Senate power structure hasn't changed much with an exception here and there, the House rankings this year reflect the way the most recent speaker's battle evolved and the conservative Republican support that Straus had to have to win it. State Rep. Larry Taylor, a Friendswood Republican who's ranked in the top 10 for the first time after having an instrumental role in the 2011 leadership fight as the House GOP Caucus chair who'd backed incumbent Tom Craddick in the speaker's race in 2009 before switching to Straus this time around. A fifth-term lawmaker who'd never been a committee chair until now, Taylor was caught in a crossfire over whether the caucus should bow to the demands of Straus' opponents and elect the speaker before Democrats had a say in the matter. Taylor handled the highly delicate situation like a maestro - and the speaker showed his gratitude by appointing the caucus boss to the lead role on the Elections Committee.

But while Taylor already had significant sway as the caucus chief for the past two years, several other former Craddick loyalists have seen their power rankings soar after having major impact on the recent speaker's race as high-profile Straus converts. Republican State Reps. Sid Miller of Stephenville and Beverly Woolley of Houston - for example - are ranked in the top 20 in 2011 after not even being listed two years ago in the top half in a chamber with 150 members.

Woolley, who lost her chairmanship position on the Calendars Committee when Straus took control initially, is the speaker pro tem now after pitching her support to him in the recent leadership contest with the most highly-publicized endorsement that he received. She's one of the two co-chairs in the House for the new Tea Party Caucus.

Miller, the Agriculture & Livestock Committee chief under Craddick, received his most plum assignment since entering the chamber 10 years ago when Straus tapped him to be the new Homeland Security & Public Safety Committee chairman. After doing some of major heavy lifting for Straus in this year's speaker's battle, Miller's increasing clout has been on display as the lead House sponsor on the emergency-tagged bill to require women to get sonograms before having abortions.

Former Craddick backers such as State Reps. Dennis Bonnen of Angleton, Lois Kolkhorst of Brenham and Vicki Truitt of Keller are ranked in the top 20 as legislators who joined the leadership team in Straus' first session at the dais and have been allies ever since. State Rep. Brandon Creighton, a third-term Conroe Republican, has surged on the power grid as well as the chairman of a Select Committee on State Sovereignty that the speaker created to deal with 10th Amendment issues that are huge in Tea Party circles. Creighton, who doubles as the vice-chairman of the General Investigating & Ethics Committee, also will be in the spotlight as the chief House sponsor of the package of civil court legislation that Governor Rick Perry and the Texans for Lawsuit Reform are pushing at the Capitol in 2011.

With Lieutenant Governor David Dewhurst and Straus not listed this year, State Senator Steve Ogden of Bryan and State Rep. Jim Pitts of Waxahachie are obvious choices for the top spots in the Senate and House power catalogues as their chambers' chief budget writers at a time when the state faces an unprecedented revenue shortage. Pitts - a Straus cardinal who's led the Appropriations Committee chairman during three of the past four regular sessions - lost the job in 2007 after waging an unsuccessful attempt to dislodge Republican Tom Craddick in the speaker's race.

Over in the Senate - where Republican State Senator Robert Duncan of Lubbock has a firm lock on second as the State Affairs Committee chairman - Ogden has amassed an amount of power that may be unrivaled in modern times for a Texas lawmaker who's not the speaker or lieutenant governor. A former state representative who served in the House with Duncan, Ogden has led the budget writing panel longer than any other senator in more than two decades. Ogden is in the midst of his fourth regular session as the Senate budget boss - one short of Democrat Grant Jones' record that ended when he lost a re-election bid in 1988. Ogden faces the most imposing challenge that any Finance chair since Jones has encountered in light of a monstrous state fiscal crisis in a Legislature with a record number of Republicans who are dead set against higher taxes. The dire nature of the current predicament has elevated Ogden and Pitts to higher levels of power than either has known until now.

State Rep. Dan Branch ranks second this year on the House power pyramid as a Dallas Republican who's the speaker's closest personal friend in the Legislature and a highly influential policy player as the Higher Education Committee chairman, a Legislative Budget Board appointee and a Redistricting Committee member at a time when legislative and congressional boundaries are about to be redrawn. Republican State Rep. Todd Hunter of Corpus Christi is a close third on the chart as the first-time chairman of the über-powerful Calendars Committee that controls the flow of legislation to the House floor. A former Democratic representative who returned to the House in 2009 as a Republican after a 12-year hiatus, Hunter led the Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence Committee two years ago before the promotion to the top job on Calendars propelled him all the way from the 17th spot on the power ladder to his current top five rating.

Five Republicans who are college of the cardinals alum - State Reps. Burt Solomons of Carrollton, Charlie Geren of Fort Worth, Byron Cook of Corsicana, Jim Keffer of Eastland and Rob Eissler of The Woodlands - occupy the next five slots on the House power list this year. Solomons made the shift from State Affairs Committee chairman to the led role on the redistricting panel for the current session. Straus tapped Cook for the State Affairs vacancy while Eissler, Keffer and Geren kept their jobs as the chairmen of the Public Education Committee, Energy Resources Committee and Administration Committee respectively.

In a chamber with a record low number of Democrats, the highest ranked Democratic members are veteran Houston State Reps. Sylvester Turner and Senfronia Thompson. Turner, a former Craddick loyalist who was one of the last Democrats on board for Straus' re-election bid this year, is the vice-chairman of the Appropriations Committee and a member of the LBB. He's Texas Legislative Black Caucus chairman this year as well. One of the chamber's most respected and effective members, Thompson has been Straus' most high-profile Democratic supporter since his first race for the leadership post. She chairs the Local & Consent Calendars Committee, which will likely emerge as a strategic battlefield as the session progresses. Thompson is the second-longest serving member in a chamber that she entered 38 years ago - and her institutional savvy coupled with the good relationship she has with the speaker gives her an added edge in the power department that isn't as evident on paper.

While the 19 highest ranked House members on the power chart are Straus allies, Republican State Rep. Wayne Christian of Center was ranked in the top 30 initially this year as a representative who's exerted substantial sway among fellow conservatives even though he was on the losing side in both speaker's races that the current incumbent won. Christian is the House co-chairman of the new Tea Party Caucus and served as the president of the Texas Conservative Coalition until several dozen Republicans voted this month to overhaul the group's leadership as part of the aftermath of the speaker's race. The TCC with Christian at the helm had secured signatures from 78 Republicans in the House and the Senate for a pledge reaffirming their support for the conservative agenda that the group that Christian led has endorsed. Christian and 14 other Republicans who voted against Straus on the floor in the speaker's election this year might be outcasts as far as the leadership team is concerned. But the attention that they attracted with their fierce opposition has turned up the pressure on Straus and company to toe the conservative line or run the risk of inviting a mid-session revolt.

Across the rotunda, State Senator Dan Patrick has assumed the role as the lead watchdog for grassroots conservatives who make up the lion's share of his audience as a radio talk show host in Houston. Patrick organized the new Tea Party Caucus several months after creating a similar group called the Independent Conservative Republicans of Texas last spring. He's the chief Senate author on the sonograms bill this year. Patrick's sign-off or disapproval has become a litmus test on whether the GOP's conservative base will favor or dislike proposals on the move under the pink granite dome. If the Senate has a real celebrity outside the Austin beltway, it's the former television sportscaster who's arguably more independent politically than any state senator here even though he's more conservative than most if not all of his GOP colleagues in the east wing.

But when it comes to the pecking order on that side of the building, Patrick still hasn't cracked the top 15 on the Senate power rankings. Despite Patrick's iconic status with conservatives and his willingness to work within the establishment, he's found that the Senate power ladder is a tough one to climb as a result of the chamber's fraternal nature, its members' longevity and the concentration of control at the pinnacle with a leadership team that's changed little at the top since David Dewhurst took over as lieutenant governor in 2003.

Ogden and Duncan have rotated between the top two spots on the Senate power grid for the past six years as the chairmen of the Finance Committee and State Affairs Committee respectively. While Ogden is first again in 2011 as the point person on the budget, Duncan can be expected to have a major role on most if not all of the high priority issues this year if history is a good indicator.

The pair of veteran GOP lawmakers on the power chart right below them - State Senators Florence Shapiro of Plano and Jane Nelson of Lewisville - have been ranked among the top five for several years as well as the leaders of the Education Committee and the Health & Human Services Committee. But the amount of sway that Nelson and Shapiro wield in the east wing will go up exponentially in 2011 with Republicans planning to plug the fiscal hole with deep cuts in programs that the committees they chair oversee.

One of the few significant changes in the Senate rankings is State Senator Kel Seliger's debut on the list in the number six spot as the chairman of the Select Committee on Redistricting. The Amarillo Republican faces a daunting test in his first major role on the leadership team as the leader of a panel that will attempt to draw a new Senate map at a time when every West Texas district will have to be extended to the east to pick up additional population they'll need to keep from being eliminated. Seliger faces a sensitive balancing act as the Senate leader of a process that must boost representation in the suburbs at the expense of rural areas in East Texas and the part of the state that he represents.

Seliger will have the unenvious task of asking his colleagues to approve a House plan that's expected to have at least two less districts in West Texas than the current map. Like all but one of the 10 highest-ranking senators on the power chart, Seliger is a member of the Finance Committee that's trying to write a new state budget in the face of a projected $27 billion revenue shortfall.

The only other Senate member to land a spot in the top 10 for the first time is a Democrat - State Senator Juan "Chuy" Hinojosa of McAllen - a former state representative whose current districts hooks the Corpus Christi area to the border in the Rio Grande Valley. Hinojosa leapfrogged three Democratic colleagues who've been perennial top 10 members as a function of his roles as the Finance Committee vice-chairman and Legislative Budget Board member in the most critical budget session in 24 years.

While the top 10 in the House includes only one Democrat, the Senate power list in 2011 features four with Democratic State Senators Judith Zaffirini of Laredo, John Whitmire of Houston, Leticia Van de Putte of San Antonio and Hinojosa. Whitmire and Zaffirini - the longest serving members in a chamber they entered in 1983 and 1987 respectively - will be major players in the budget fight as well as the leaders of the Criminal Justice Committee and Higher Education Committee. Zaffirini had been the Finance Committee vice-chair until Dewhurst transformed a subcommittee on higher education into a standing panel two years ago and selected her to be its first chair.

Van de Putte, the Veteran Affairs & Military Installations Committee chair, will have a major part in every fight that plays out along partisan lines as the leader of the Senate Democratic Caucus. The party leadership role that Van de Putte won initially eight years ago is critical in a chamber where Democrats still have enough votes when united to kill bills with the two-thirds rule. The Senate Democrats will be in position to have more impact than ever as a result of their ability to use the two-thirds rule to fight the conservative agenda that the House embraces with its first GOP supermajority.

House Democrats - in sharp contrast - will be putting up spirited fights while hoping for reinforcement support from moderate Republicans on key issues. Houston State Rep. Jessica Farrar, a veteran lawmaker who's in the midst of her first turn as the House Democratic Caucus leader, doesn't have the leverage that her Senate counterpart Van de Putte can employ but is ranked relatively high on the power chart as a result of the potential that her position offers. State Reps. Garnet Coleman of Houston and Pete Gallego of Alpine - who've had significant clout in recent years as floor generals for the minority party and co-leaders of the House Democratic Campaign Committee - are still key players despite the numbers disadvantage in a chamber where Democrats were instrumental in Straus' second speaker's race but not as pivotal as they'd been in his first.

Coleman, who's been one of the House's most effective, passionate and knowledgeable members in policy debate since the 1990s, is the kind of lawmaker who knows how to use the power he has for maximum impact. But the Democrats on the west side of the rotunda have slipped significantly on the power chart in 2011 after the most disastrous election on the House battlefield for them in memory.

While the Democrats take a hit, some of the former Craddick lieutenants who rallied behind Straus in this year's leadership battle have seen their power stock soar since the regular session got under way. Republican State Rep. Larry Phillips of Sherman - for example - jumped from the mid-50s into the top 20 as a lawmaker who'd been a Straus foe in 2009 before being accused late last year of threatening colleagues who still opposed the speaker with the possibility of punishment in redistricting. Phillips, who denied the accusations under oath, drew a plum assignment after Straus won again as the new Transportation Committee chairman.

Ex-Craddick backers like Republican State Reps. Jim Jackson of Carrollton, Mike Hamilton of Mauriceville, Bill Callegari of Katy and Harvey Hilderbran of Kerrville are enjoying newfound sway at the Capitol this year as legislators who are chairing key committees after switching their allegiance to Straus in his second race for speaker.

Committee assignments are the most obvious measure of power in the Legislature while partisan leadership posts are a key gauge as well. But there are other important variables that go into the mix. On the House side, as an example, top-level Straus lieutenants like Branch and Solomons are all the more powerful as a result of the massive political war chests they've amassed as a major incentive for anyone who's thinking about challenging them at the polls to forget about it.

Branch and Solomons entered 2011 with more than $1 million apiece in cash on hand in their campaign accounts. Pitts, Eissler, Hunter and Cook all had campaign cash balances of more than $500,000 each or close to it at the end of last year. Branch has another key bullet on his power resume as a state representative who's been popular with the constituents he represents in the affluent Dallas enclave of Highland Park where a significant number of the GOP's biggest donors live.

Lawmakers will have opportunities to expand their clout as the session progresses in a variety of ways including roles that some will have as the sponsors of major legislation and members of the conference committees that shape the final products. Others will gain new levels of sway with potential game-changing amendments and other moves that are unforeseen at this stage of the session.

But even though redistricting will be competing for the spotlight in the next two months, the big fight under the pink granite dome in 2011 revolves on money - or the lack of it - and that will be a root of immense power for those who are calling the shots and on the front lines in the budget battle. Republican State Reps. John Otto of Dayton and John Zerwas of Houston are perfect examples as a pair of legislators who could have chaired high-level standing committees but opted for spots on Appropriations instead because they believed that's where their talents were most needed. Zerwas and Otto, the budget subcommittee chairs on health and human services and criminal justice respectively, are the only two Republican lawmakers who are ranked in the top 20 on the power chart even though they've chosen to forego the opportunity to lead standing panels this year. And it would be easy to make the case that they're still underrated.

While most freshmen lawmakers and second-term colleagues must pay their dues before landing spots on the power charts in their respective chambers, some newcomers who are off to auspicious starts like Democratic State Rep. Eric Johnson of Dallas and Republican State Reps. Lance Gooden of Terrell, Dee Margo of El Paso, Charles Schwertner of Georgetown and Raul Torres of Corpus Christi as Straus appointees on the Appropriations Committee.

 

TEXAS SENATE
Committee Assignments
and Other Power Posts
1
Steve
Ogden

R-Bryan
Finance Chairman; Education; Administration; Education; Government Organization; Legislative Budget Board; Legislative Audit Committee
2
Robert
Duncan

R-Lubbock
State Affairs Chairman; Finance; Higher Education; Jurisprudence; Natural Resources; Legislative Budget Board
3
Florence
Shapiro

R-Plano
Education Chairman; Finance; Finance Subcommittee on Public Education Funding Chairman; Transportation & Homeland Security; Administration
4
Jane
Nelson

R-Lewisville
Health & Human Services Chairman; Finance; Finance Subcommittee on Medicaid Chairman; Government Organization; Nominations
5
Kel
Seliger

R-Amarillo
Redistricting Chairman; Finance; Education; International Relations & Trade; Natural Resources
6
Juan
Hinojosa

D-McAllen
Finance Vice-Chairman; Redistricting; Natural Resources; Transportation & Homeland Security; Agriculture & Rural Affairs; Criminal Justice; Legislative Budget Board
7
Judith
Zaffirini

D-Laredo
Higher Education Chairman; Finance; Redistricting; Administration; Economic Development; Health & Human Services; Legislative Budget Board
8
John
Whitmire

D-Houston
Criminal Justice Chairman; Finance; Finance Subcommittee on Medicaid; Administration; Business & Commerce; Government Organization; Dean of the Senate
9
John
Carona

R-Dallas
Business & Commerce Chairman; Redistricting; Criminal Justice; Education; Jurisprudence
10
Leticia
Van de Putte

D-San Antonio
Veteran Affairs & Military Installations Chairman; State Affairs; Education; Business & Commerce; Senate Democratic Caucus Chairman
11
Tommy
Williams

R-The Woodlands
Transportation & Homeland Security Chairman; Finance; Finance Subcommittee on Medicaid; Redistricting; State Affairs; International Relations & Trade
12
Kevin
Eltife

R-Tyler
Administration Chairman; Finance; Finance Subcommittee on Medicaid; Redistricting; Business & Commerce; Economic Development; Natural Resources
13
Glenn
Hegar

R-Katy
Sunset Advisory Commission Co-Chairman; Government Organization Vice-Chairman; Nominations Vice-Chairman; Criminal Justice; Natural Resources; Agriculture & Rural Affairs
14
Bob
Deuell

R-Greenville
Nominations Chairman; State Affairs Vice-Chairman; Health and Human Services Vice-Chairman; Finance; Finance Subcommittee on Medicaid; Natural Resources
15
Troy
Fraser

R-Horseshoe Bay
Natural Resources Chairman; Economic Development Vice-Chairman; Redistricting; State Affairs; Nominations; International Relations & Trade
16
Dan
Patrick

R-Houston
Education Vice-Chair; Finance; Redistricting; Criminal Justice; Health & Human Services; Intergovernmental Relations; Subcommittee on Public Education Funding; Subcommittee on Flooding & Evacuations; Tea Party Caucus Founder and Chair
17
Mike
Jackson

R-Lake Jackson
Economic Development Chairman; Agriculture & Rural Affairs; Business & Commerce;
Natural Resources; State Affairs
18
Royce
West

D-Dallas
Intergovernmental Relations Chairman; Redistricting; Finance; Finance Subcommittee on Public Education Funding; Education; Higher Education; Health & Human Services
19
Chris
Harris

R-Arlington
Jurisprudence Chairman; Business & Commerce Vice-Chairman; Transportation & Homeland Security; Economic Development
20
Jeff
Wentworth

R-San Antonio
Select Committee on Open Government Chair; Veteran Affairs & Military Installations Vice-Chairman; Redistricting; Administration; Higher Education; Transportation & Homeland Security; Intergovernmental Relations
21
Craig
Estes

R-Wichita Falls
Agriculture & Rural Affairs Chairman; Natural Resources Vice-Chairman; Finance; Finance Subcommittee on Public Education Funding; Redistricting; Business & Commerce; Veteran Affairs & Military Installations
22
Eddie
Lucio Jr.

D-Brownsville
International Relations & Trade Chairman; Finance; Finance Subcommittee on Public Education Funding; State Affairs; Business & Commerce; Government Organization
23
Rodney
Ellis

D-Houston
Government Organization Chairman; State Affairs; Transportation & Homeland Security; Criminal Justice
24
Mario
Gallegos

D-Houston
Redistricting Vice-Chairman; Education; Jurisprudence; International Relations & Trade; Intergovernmental Relations; Subcommittee on Flooding & Evacuations Chairman

 

TEXAS HOUSE
Committee Assignments
and Other Power Posts

1

Jim
Pitts

R-Waxahachie
Appropriations Chairman; Select Committee on State Sovereignty; Legislative Budget Board; Legislative Audit Committee; Legislative Reference Library Board
2
Dan
Branch

R-Dallas
Higher Education Chairman; Calendars; Redistricting; Elections, Select Committee on State Sovereignty; Legislative Budget Board
3
Todd
Hunter

R-Corpus Christi
Calendars Chairman; Redistricting; Corrections; Human Services; General Investigating & Ethics; Select Election Contest Committee Chairman
4
Burt
Solomons

R-Carrollton
Redistricting Chairman; Calendars; State Affairs; Business & Industry
5
Byron
Cook

R-Corsicana
State Affairs Chairman; Calendars
6
Charlie
Geren

R-Fort Worth
Administration Chairman; Calendars; Redistricting; State Affairs; Licensing & Administrative Procedures; State Preservation Board
7
Jim
Keffer

R-Eastland
Energy Resources Chairman; Calendars; Redistricting; Natural Resources
8
Rob
Eissler

R-The Woodlands
Public Education Chairman; Redistricting; Administration; Technology
9
Larry
Taylor

R-Friendswood
Elections Chairman; Insurance; Select Committee on Voter Identification & Voter Fraud; House Republican Caucus Chairman
10
Sylvester
Turner

D-Houston
Appropriations Vice-Chairman; State Affairs; Legislative Budget Board; Texas Legislative Black Caucus Chairman
11
Dennis
Bonnen

R-Angleton
Sunset Advisory Commission Co-Chairman; Select Committee on Voter Identification & Voter Fraud Chairman; Calendars Vice-Chairman; Higher Education; Transportation; Select Election Contest Committee
12
Brandon
Creighton

R-Conroe
Select Committee on State Sovereignty Chairman; General Investigating & Ethics Vice-Chairman; Natural Resources; Pensions, Investments & Financial Services
13
Beverly
Woolley

R-Houston
Speaker Pro Tem; Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence; Ways & Means; Tea Party Caucus Co-Chair
14
Vicki
Truitt

R-Keller
Pensions, Investments & Financial Services Chairman; Calendars; Public Health
15
Sid
Miller

R-Stephenville
Homeland Security & Public Safety Chairman; Administration; Business & Industry
16
Lois
Kolkhorst

R-Brenham
Public Health Chairman; Calendars; Land & Resource Management; Select Election Contest
17
Senfronia
Thompson

D-Houston
Local & Consent Calendars Chairman; Licensing & Administrative Procedures; Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence Insurance; Select Committee on State Sovereignty
18
Larry
Phillips

R-Sherman
Transportation Chairman; Redistricting; General Investigating & Ethics; Border & Intergovernmental Affairs
19
John
Otto

R-Dayton
Appropriations; Appropriations Subcommittee on Article I, IV and V Chairman; Ways & Means Vice-Chairman
20
John
Zerwas

R-Houston
Appropriations; Appropriations Subcommittee on Article II Chairman; Calendars, Public Health
21
Allan
Ritter

R-Nederland
Natural Resources Chairman; Calendars; Ways & Means
22
John
Smithee

R-Amarillo
Insurance Chairman; State Affairs
23
Chuck
Hopson

R-Jacksonville
General Investigating & Ethics Chairman; Natural Resources; Human Services
24
Jim
Jackson

R-Carrollton
Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence Chairman; County Affairs
25
Aaron
Peña

R-Edinburg
Technology Chairman; Redistricting; Homeland Security & Public Safety; Select Committee on Voter Identification & Voter Fraud; Hispanic Republican Conference Chairman
26
Harvey
Hilderbran

R-Kerrville
Ways & Means Chairman; Redistricting; State Affairs; Select Committee on Voter Identification & Voter Fraud; Legislative Budget Board; Legislative Audit Committee
27
Mike
Hamilton

R-Mauriceville
Licensing & Administrative Procedures Chairman; County Affairs
28
Wayne
Christian

R-Center
Ways & Means; Criminal Jurisprudence; Texas Conservative Coalition President; Tea Party Caucus Co-Chair
29
Garnet
Coleman

D-Houston
County Affairs Chairman; Calenders; Public Health; Legislative Study Group Chairman; House Democratic Campaign Committee Co-Chair
30
Jessica
Farrar

D-Houston
Environmental Regulation Vice-Chairman; Border & Intergovernmental Affairs; House Democratic Caucus Leader
31
Bill
Callegari

R-Katy
Government Efficiency & Reform Chairman; Urban Affairs
32
Wayne
Smith

R-Baytown
Environmental Regulation Chairman; County Affairs; Select Election Contest
33
Scott
Hochberg

D-Houston
Appropriations; Appropriations Subcommittee on Article III Chairman; Public Education Vice-Chairman
34
Jimmie Don
Aycock

R-Killeen
Appropriations; Appropriations Subcommittee on Current Fiscal Condition Chairman; Redistricting; Public Education
35
Jerry
Madden

R-Plano
Corrections Chairman; Redistricting; Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence; Select Election Contest
36
Richard
Raymond

D-Laredo
Human Services Chairman; Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence
37
Mike
Villarreal

D-San Antonio
Redistricting Vice-Chairman; Appropriations; Ways & Means
38
Joe
Deshotel

D-Beaumont
Business & Industry Chairman; Culture, Recreation & Tourism
39
Ruth
McClendon

D-San Antonio
Rules & Resolutions Chairman; Appropriations; Transportation
40
Veronica
Gonzales

D-McAllen
Border & Intergovernmental Affairs Chairman; Public Health
41
Drew
Darby

R-San Angelo
Appropriations; Transportation Vice-Chairman; Local & Consent Calendars
42
John
Davis

R-Houston
Economic & Small Business Development Chairman; Energy Resources
43
Trey
Martinez Fischer

D-San Antonio
Ways & Means; Natural Resources; Mexican American Legislative Caucus Chairman
44
Pete
Gallego

D-Alpine
Criminal Jurisprudence Chairman; State Affairs; General Investigating & Ethics; House Democratic Campaign Committee Co-Chair
45
Rene
Oliveira

D-Brownsville
Land & Resource Management Chairman; State Affairs
46
Joe
Pickett

D-El Paso
Defense & Veterans' Affairs Chairman; Redistricting; Transportation
47
Will
Hartnett

R-Dallas
Criminal Jurisprudence Vice-Chairman, Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence; Select Election Contest Special Master
48
Marc
Veasey

D-Fort Worth
Select Committee on Voter Identification & Voter Fraud Vice-Chairman; Redistricting; Elections; Pensions, Investments & Financial Services; House Democratic Caucus Chairman
49
Harold
Dutton

D-Houston
Urban Affairs Chairman; Public Education
50
Rick
Hardcastle

R-Vernon
Agriculture & Livestock Chairman; Border & Intergovernmental Affairs
51
Ryan
Guillen

D-Rio Grande City
Culture, Recreation & Tourism Chairman; Public Education; Select Election Contest
52
Craig
Eiland

D-Galveston
Appropriations; Insurance Vice-Chairman
53
Tracy
King

D-Batesville
Natural Resources Vice-Chairman; Calendars; Culture, Recreation & Tourism; Rules & Resolutions
54
Patricia
Harless

R-Houston
Redistricting; State Affairs; Licensing and Administrative Procedures; Select Committee on Voter Identification and Voter Fraud
55
Jose
Menendez

D-San Antonio
State Affairs Vice-Chairman; Licensing and Administrative Procedures
56
Eddie
Lucio III

D-Brownsville
Government Efficiency & Reform Vice-Chairman; Calendars; Natural Resources
57
Myra
Crownover

R-Denton
Appropriations; Energy Resources Vice-Chairman
58
Geanie
Morrison

R-Victoria
Appropriations; Public Health Vice-Chairman
59
Angie Chen
Button

R-Garland
Appropriations; Technology Vice-Chairman
60
Mark
Shelton

R-Fort Worth
Appropriations; Public Education
61
Susan
King

R-Abilene
Appropriations; Administration, Public Health
62
Diane
Patrick

R-Arlington
Appropriations; Higher Education
63
Doug
Miller

R-New Braunfels
Appropriations; Natural Resources
64
Dawnna
Dukes

D-Austin
Appropriations; Culture, Recreation and Tourism
65
Donna
Howard

D-Austin
Administration Vice- Chairman; Higher Education;
Technology
66
Charles "Doc"
Anderson

R-Waco
Agriculture and Livestock Vice-Chairman; Pensions, Investments and Financial Services
67
Gary
Elkins

R-Houston
Culture, Recreation & Tourism Vice-Chairman; Ways & Means; Local & Consent Calendars
68
Allen
Fletcher

R-Houston
Homeland Security & Public Safety Vice-Chairman; Transportation
69
Dwayne
Bohac

R-Houston
Business & Industry; Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence; Local and Consent Calendars
70
Armando
Martinez

D-Welaco
Appropriations; Transportation
71
Helen
Giddings

D-Dallas
Appropriations; Business & Industry; Select Election Contest Committee
72
Hubert
Vo

D-Houston
Economic and Small Business Development Vice- Chairman; Administration;
Insurance
73
Kelly
Hancock

R-N. Richland Hills
Local & Consent Calendars Vice-Chairman; Insurance; Environmental Regulation
74
Linda
Harper-Brown

R-Irving
Transportation; Government Efficiency & Reform;
Local & Consent Calendars;
Rules & Resolutions
75
Joe
Driver

R-Garland
Homeland Security & Public Safety; Licensing & Administrative Procedures
Copyright 2003-2011 Capitol Inside
Photocopying, printing, or reproducing in any other form in whole or in part is a
violation of federal copyright law and is strictly prohibited without the publisher's
consent. Phone: (512) 917-1697